Zero Tolerance in Safety Corridors

by Aaron Black • February 24, 2017
Zero tolerance in Safety CorridorsHave you noticed new “Entering Safety Corridor” signs along the I-10 in downtown Phoenix? In a push to enforce “hazardous violations” such as unsafe lane changes, speeding, driving under the influence (DUI) and tailgating, state troopers will be enforcing zero tolerance along many corridors in Phoenix.

According to the Phoenix New Times, the safety corridors are an effort by the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT), the Arizona Department of Public Safety (DPS), and the Governor's Office of Highway Safety to make the roads safer for everyone by reducing fatalities, severe injuries and crashes in general. View ADOT’s safety corridor map to learn more.

Many of the corridors marked for zero tolerance are known areas for DWI’s, aggressive driving and driving without a seatbelt. In addition, Troopers may also pull you over for going just a few miles per hour over the speed limit which generally is a pretext to check for impaired driving or other reasons that are generally unrelated to speeding.

Funded by a grant from the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety, State Troopers aren’t the only thing you need to be aware of as the $120,000 grant also includes aircraft to assist in patrolling the corridors.

Civil, Criminal speeding tickets and a DUI

  • A civil speeding ticket is issued for typical moving violations such as speeding, running a red light or failure to yield. In addition to fines and an 83% surcharge, depending on the violation you will receive between 3-4 points on your license.
     
  • A criminal speeding ticket is of course far more serious than a civil ticket. Criminal speeding is considered a class 3 misdemeanor. The maximum penalty can result in 30 days in jail, $500 fine, up to one year of probation and an 83% surcharge. A ticket of this nature involves going 20 mph over the posted speed limit or exceeding 85 mph anywhere in the state.
     
  • A DUI in Phoenix regardless of whether it’s a first-time offense carries stiff penalties. With some of the harshest penalties in the nation a first-time misdemeanor for driving under the influence (under .15 Blood Alcohol Content - BAC) alone carries a minimum of 10 days in jail, fines and the Ignition interlock device. Factor in a simple car accident where drugs or alcohol were involved and the charges become more serious especially if a person was injured or worse yet killed.
A civil speeding citation generally doesn’t warrant a criminal defense attorney however if you have been charged with a criminal speeding ticket or a DUI I encourage you to seek legal representation.

Drive safely not just in the safe corridors rather anytime that you get behind the wheel of a car.

If you have been charged with criminal speeding or a DUI contact the Law Office of Aaron Black for a free consultation today at (480)729-1683.